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The 2018 World Development Report on Education:a critical analysis/ Steven J. Klees, Nelly P. Stromquist, Joel Samoff and Salim Vally

General notes: Accesss online via Research4Life;
ISSN: 1467-7660;
Author(s): Klees, Steven J.;
Stromquist, Nelly P.; Vally, Salim;
Subjects: Education --reports and evaluations;
World Development Report on Education, 2018 --Commentary;
Summary notes: The World Development Report (WDR), the annual flagship publication of the World Bank and first published in 1978, is different from these strategy papers. In the 40-year history of the WDR, the 2018 Report entitled Learning to Realize Education’s Promise is the first time the WDR’s focus has been on education. While the strategy papers are influential among ministries of education, the WDR is circulated to ministries of finance and broadlywithinthedevelopmentcommunity.Withtheproduction of a WDR focused on education in 2018, subtitled Learning to Realize Education’sPromise the World Bank makes a decisive claim to its authority in education policy. The 2018 WDR begins by highlighting the extensive consultations undertaken with researchers and specialists across the world who provided feedback and suggestions for this 216-page report. The 2018 WDR covers a lot of territory and here we can comment only on some of the issues raised. Overall, we find that the Report continues to reflect the narrow views that World Bank economists have long brought to education (Klees et al., 2012). In what follows, we begin by unpacking the bases on which the Report and its recommendations are framed. We argue that the preconceptions in framing preclude the consideration of broader development discourses. We then examine the treatment of four specific coreissuesintheReport:learning,teachers,privatizationandfinance,noting the biases in how they are presented. Next, we take as a case in point an area of major, global concern — equity in women and men’s education — and consider how the Report neglects decades of theory and research in framing and presenting its treatment of gender issues. Finally, we offer some concluding observations about the 2018 WDR and its implications for understanding the nature of and problems with the World Bank.;
Type: Journal article
Available At: view online
Host: Development and Change 50(2): 603–620
Availability: View details
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008191121
022 $a1467-7660
100 $aKlees, Steven J.
24504$aThe 2018 World Development Report on Education$ba critical analysis$cSteven J. Klees, Nelly P. Stromquist, Joel Samoff and Salim Vally
500 $aAccesss online via Research4Life
520 $aThe World Development Report (WDR), the annual flagship publication of the World Bank and first published in 1978, is different from these strategy papers. In the 40-year history of the WDR, the 2018 Report entitled Learning to Realize Education’s Promise is the first time the WDR’s focus has been on education. While the strategy papers are influential among ministries of education, the WDR is circulated to ministries of finance and broadlywithinthedevelopmentcommunity.Withtheproduction of a WDR focused on education in 2018, subtitled Learning to Realize Education’sPromise the World Bank makes a decisive claim to its authority in education policy. The 2018 WDR begins by highlighting the extensive consultations undertaken with researchers and specialists across the world who provided feedback and suggestions for this 216-page report.$bThe 2018 WDR covers a lot of territory and here we can comment only on some of the issues raised. Overall, we find that the Report continues to reflect the narrow views that World Bank economists have long brought to education (Klees et al., 2012). In what follows, we begin by unpacking the bases on which the Report and its recommendations are framed. We argue that the preconceptions in framing preclude the consideration of broader development discourses. We then examine the treatment of four specific coreissuesintheReport:learning,teachers,privatizationandfinance,noting the biases in how they are presented. Next, we take as a case in point an area of major, global concern — equity in women and men’s education — and consider how the Report neglects decades of theory and research in framing and presenting its treatment of gender issues. Finally, we offer some concluding observations about the 2018 WDR and its implications for understanding the nature of and problems with the World Bank.
61000$aWorld Development Report on Education, 2018$xCommentary
650 0$aEducation$vreports and evaluations
700 $aStromquist, Nelly P.
700 $aVally, Salim
773 $tDevelopment and Change 50(2): 603–620

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